Showing posts with label Incredible Hog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Incredible Hog. Show all posts

Sunday, August 31, 2014

The Day After The Sabbath 105: Goin' Down [covers special] *UPDATED*

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unzip password:  tdats

Freddie King's 'Getting Ready...' LP
feat. 'Going Down'
Welcome to a tribute to one of the eternally durable and most frequently-covered rock songs of all time. It has the fast chugging riffage that made it perfect for any hard rock bands that were looking for a good blues song to cover back in the early days, which I guess is why it happened so often. What inspired this volume of TDATS is the frequency with which I have run into it, a large number of previous TDATS-appearing bands have recorded it.

I had always absent-mindedly presumed it was a blues standard, by some famous bluesman from way back. On formulating this comp, first investigations found that person was probably Freddie King in 1971, which seemed a good enough answer, although he was a later-generation blues player. While coincidentally listening to the great Moloch album soon after, I noticed that they had a version of Going Down, but the album was made in 1969. This really confused me! So at this point it became a real mission to find out what was going on...

There's no wasting time with an intro in the Freddie King version of this song. It seems he set the president with that urgent, repetitive nature of the opening D chord, followed by the descending scale, getting down to business straight away and sounding mean as hell with it. It definitely has that essence of what is now called heavy metal, which is what I dig about it so much, and it's clear a lot of early heavy bands agreed!

Track List
01. Walter Rossi - Goin' Down (1976)
       from album 'Walter Rossi'
02. Booker T. & The M.G.'s - Slim Jenkins' Place (1967)
       from album 'Hip Hug-Her'
03. Moloch - Going Down (1969)
       from album 'Moloch'
04. Stone The Crows - Goin' Down (1971)
       from album 'BBC Live In Paris 1971'
05. Freddie King - Going Down (1971)
       from album 'Getting Ready...'
06. Chicken Shack - Going Down (1972)
       from album 'Imagination Lady'
07. Freedom - Going Down (1972)
       from album 'Freedom Is More Than a Word'
08. Dixie Peach - Going Down (1975)
       from album 'Dixie Peach'
09. Jukin' Bone - Going Down (1972)
       from album 'Whiskey Woman'
10. Karthago - Going Down (1976)
       from album 'Live At The Roxy'
11. Tommy Bolin & Energy - Goin' Down (1972)
       from album 'The Energy Radio Broadcasts 1972'
12. Incredible Hog - Goin' Down (1973)
       from reissue 'Volume 1 +4'
13. Hydra - Going Down (1974)
       from album 'Hydra'
14. Don Nix - Going Down (1972)
       from album 'The Alabama State Troupers Road Show'
15. Don Nix - Going Down (year unknown) *** NEW ADDITION 16/12/2014
       from Phillip Rauls archive of radio broadcasts
You can download track 15 on it's own here if you do not wish to download the whole thing again.

[EDIT: An new track has been added to this comp today, 16th December 2014. This was found here, in a short piece from the youtube channel of record industry veteran Phillip Rauls. In it he presents another Don Nix-recorded version of the song, at the beginning of which, Don says he wrote it for Elvis Presley, who did not record it. Interestingly, even Don doesn't mention that Moloch were the first act to record it, and he himself says it was Freddie King. If you look in the comments of the youtube clip, you'll see Larry Changes (claiming to be a one-time Moloch member) asking why Phillip omitted to mention Moloch's version. Phillip says that the reaction to Moloch's version was so slight that it wasn't worth mentioning!



In reply to that, Larrry says: "When I was in Moloch (also played w/ Raspberry in Alamo, & Tarp & Jay Spell in Money), we weren't too 'current' on sales & airplay, but we found time for endeavors like kickin' Johnny Winter's arse at the shell (3 encores to his 2)... when other cats boasted of doin' a couple of Freddie King songs, we were able to say Freddie did a couple of ours. His favorite was Same Old Blues... he loved PhilipDale's vocals; first question he asked me was,"WHO is singin' vocals on that Same Old Blues song?" PhilipDale's vocals was how we got that third encore at the Shell, doin' 'Phil's Blues']

The history of the song is entwined with producer/writer/musician Don Nix, the band Moloch, and the bluesman Freddie King. So entwined in fact, that it's been hard to get to the bottom of it. Most people familiar with the song will say that it's a Freddie King original, but it's not the case. Listen to the Tommy Bolin track in this comp, even he introduces it as a Freddie King song. The first time it appeared on record was the s/t album from Memphis's "Moloch" in 1969. At the time, Moloch guitarist Lee Baker was friends with Don Nix, who produced Moloch's sole album, and has writing credits on most of its tracks.

Don Nix has a connection to Freddie King also...having started out as saxophonist in Memphis R&B group The Mar-Keys, he became an important figure in "Memphis soul", producing for the associated Stax and Ardent labels. The Mar-Keys would evolve into R&B legends "Booker T. and the M.G.'s", which included such names as Steve Cropper. Freddie King's 1971 album 'Get Ready...' was produced by Don, with him writing two tracks (including Going Down) and co-writing two others.

Lee Baker
Regarding Moloch, I recently got in touch with the last-surviving member, bassist Steve Spear. He had this to tell me: "I remember being in the old Ardent studios on National with Moloch. I can’t remember what I played on (we are talking late 60’s).  Lee Baker played bass on the tunes I didn't play on. I didn't play on the single [that came out in 1972 after the album]. Don Nix actually recruited me for bass after the original bassist, Mike Reddock I think his name was, bowed out. As you know Don was in the Mar-Keys and Lee was in some of the early bands in Memphis. They both had an affinity for Furry Lewis. So I would assume that’s how they knew each other. I was the youngest in the band so I didn't know the earlier history of those guys. 


Steve Spear in recent times
I’m involved in a project right now with Don. He is producing an album for Danny Green in Memphis. Drummer Joel Williams and I played on 4 tracks, 3 of which made it to the album. I think they are seeking a deal with Sony."

Amongst other projects, Steve currently plays in "Down 2 Five". Following the tragic murder of Lee Baker in 1996, I have found some information regarding his later band Mud Boy and the Neutrons and Moloch, here,  for those who are interested.

Just to make things even clearer, in 1972 Don sang and released his own version of Going Down, as a single taken from the album "The Alabama State Troopers Road Show", a travelling revue designed to showcase the talents of various Southern musicians who had been signed to the Elektra imprint.

So where does this leave us when trying to get down to the roots of this song? I am very grateful to TDATS fb group member Robbert, for pointing out that the instrumental track "Slim Jenkins' Place", on the 1967 Booker T and the M.G.'s album "Hip Hug-Her", has the same bass line as Goin' Down. Writing credits on that track go to Al Jackson, Booker T. Jones, Donald Dunn and Steve Cropper. The track is included in this comp. Could it be that Don adapted this short instrumental into his own thing with Goin' Down? It sure looks that way, as he is not credited as writer of "Slim Jenkins' Place". With the record being on the Stax label, maybe he did however have some indirect input...

Also included here are versions from some bands that will be well-known to TDATS readers; Walter Rossi (Vols 523), Chicken Shack (Vols 20 & 74), Freedom (Vols 79 & 100), Jukin' Bone (Vol 10) and Incredible Hog (Vols 463). The Incredible Hog version is taken from the Rise Above Relics reissue Vol 1 +4.

Along for the ride come some new-to-TDATS names that some readers may think it's well about time...



Stone The Crows
The awesome pipes of Maggie Bell and Stone The Crows introduce the only female-vocalled version here; "Stone The Crows were formed after Maggie Bell was introduced to Les Harvey by his elder brother, Alex Harvey. After playing together in the Kinning Park Ramblers, they rejoined in a band named Power, later renamed Stone the Crows (after a British/Australian English exclamation of surprise or shock) by Led Zeppelin's manager, Peter Grant. The band was co-managed by Grant and Mark London. London was associated with Lulu as the co-writer of her signature song, "To Sir With Love" and was also married to Lulu's manager, Marion Massey. London had also managed the predecessor band Cartoone, which featured Les Harvey on guitar, and in which Peter Grant had a financial interest.

Original line-up.
Maggie Bell, vocals. Les Harvey, guitar. Colin Allen, drums; ex-Zoot Money's Big Roll Band and John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, later performed with Focus. James Dewar, bass; later performed and sang with Robin Trower's band. John McGinnis, keyboards. The band's first two albums were recorded by this line-up, with Bell's vocals "reminiscent of Janis Joplin".

Second line-up
McGinnis and Dewar left in 1971, to be replaced by Ronnie Leahy and Steve Thompson. Jimmy McCulloch would subsequently replace Harvey as lead guitarist following Harvey's accidental on-stage death by electrocution at Swansea's Top Rank Suite in May 1972. As he was the band's primary songwriter as well as Maggie Bell's romantic partner, Harvey's death almost led to the Stone the Crows' breakup.

Stone the Crows ultimately broke up in June 1973. Peter Grant would continue to manage Maggie Bell's career following the band's breakup, with Bell subsequently recording two solo albums under Grant's tutelage, Queen of the Night (1974) and Suicide Sal (1975), and a 1981 album with the Grant-managed band Midnight Flyer. Bell may be best known, however, for her session work on Rod Stewart's 1971 album Every Picture Tells a Story, in particular her co-lead vocal with Stewart on the album's title track (credited as "vocal abrasives"). Jimmy McCulloch joined Paul McCartney's group, Wings, in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1974."

Dixie Peach LP rear cover
Dixie Peach (link) made one album in 1974. Their version of Goin' Down here is one of the most different sounding ones, having a long build-up and a slower vibe over-all. "Dixie Peach from Ohio, playing Southern blues-rock, has risen again. Formed in 1972 by slide guitarist extraordinaire, singer and songwriter Ira Stanley with Steve Williams (keyboards), Mike “Roscoe” Rousculp (bass), Tony Paulus (guitar, keyboards) and Jerry Barnhart (drums), they released one album (out of print) before breaking up in 1975. Reforming in 1998 and releasing Butta in 2002, they jam out better than ever, their spicy-as-barbecue sound featuring the  original members save for drummer Steve Benson. Beginning in 1973, Dixie Peach started touring full time and played gigs from Buffalo, New York to Tampa, Florida and released its first album in 1974. Dixie Peach has been an opening act for many national artists including Joe Walsh, Lee Roy Parnell, Johnny Winter, Cheap Trick, Tesla, Larry Carlton, Roy Buchanan, Spirit, New York Dolls, Billy Cobham, Blue Oyster Cult, and many others."

Jukin' Bone.
L-R: Mark, Tom, Joe, George & John, 1970
With a nice fast n' heavy interpretation, we have Jukin' Bone. Taken from Ron Wray :- "With its lineup finally set in the fall of 1971, [NY Syracuse band] 'Free Will' changed its name to "Jukin' Bone."  Now with a recording contract with RCA Records the band entered Jimi Hendrix's Electric Ladyland Studio in New York City in 1972  and recorded their first album for RCA "Whiskey Woman".  Now a lineup change as drummer Tom Glaister married and left the band. He was replaced by two drummers Kevin Shwaryk & Danny Coward

Their album "Way Down East"  followed (1973) along with two singles "Whiskey Woman" (1972)  and "Cara Lynn' (1972). One very important fact of note, Jukin' Bone was one of the most electrifying live bands you will ever see. They went on tour, but never received enough promotion across the country, although they perhaps came very close to national stardom. 

Their November-December 1972 tour consisted of the following stops- Alabama (Montgomery & Huntsville), Arkansas (Ft Smith), Iowa (DesMoines), Kansas (Wichita), Louisiana (Monroe, Shreveport), Minnesota (Duluth, Minn,-St Paul), Missouri (Columbia), North Carolina (Ashville), North & South Dakota, Tennessee (Memphis), Texas (Austin, Dallas, Harlingen, Houston, Odessa, San Angelo, Waco) and Wisconsin (Madison, Sheboygan).


 July 14, 1973, drummer Danny Coward departed leaving Jukin Bone just a four man group (Mark Doyle, Joe Whiting, John DeMaso & Kevin Shwaryk). In the fall of 1973, Jukin Bone', one of Syracuse's greatest groups, disbanded. Mark Doyle went to play with DUV (Dave Hanlon, Rick Cua) and David Werner, Joe Whiting joined Bobby Comstock on tour and the rest went their separate ways."

Berlin's Kathago, generally known for fusion/funk rather than hard rock or blues, played this cover live in 1976, available on their 'Live at the Roxy' LP. Allmusic :- "Just months after their formation in Berlin in 1970, Karthago began recording music for their first album. Karthago's sound was influenced more by North American rock than by anything that was coming out of Europe, composed of a tapered and rather simplistic mixture of light funk and freestyle jazz with a basic rock & roll substratum for everything else to rest on. Within the album's nine tracks are melodies that are accommodating and recognizable, quite different than what was otherwise coming out Germany's music scene in the early '70s.

"String Rambler," "Black Fire," and "Morning Surprise" best represent Karthago's breezy, undemanding air, led by the bright organ playing of Ingo Bischoff and fastened by Wolfgang Brock's unmitigated drum work. "Why Don't You Stop Buggin' Me" and the shimmering "wow" of "But I Know"'s keyboard-guided intro lead into some electrifying pieces, with comparisons to Steppenwolf, Procol Harum, and even early Chicago arising from the melodies. Although labeled as a progressive band, Karthago's sound is more along the lines of German rock rather than prog, with shorter song lengths and a tendency to balance out the keyboards, guitar, and percussion equally throughout their music. After their fourth album in 1976, Karthago broke up, with Gerald Hartwig joining the more prominent Guru Guru and Bischof hooking up with Kraan. Second Step (1973) and 1974's Rock 'N' Roll Testament begin to show signs of commercial leanings, but their last installment, entitled Live at the Roxy, is just as impressive as their debut album."


Tommy Bolin's Energy
Energy were formed in 1971 in Boulder, Colorado when Tommy Bolin and Bobby Berge left Zephyr (see Vol 49). They appear with a Radio broadcast, having never released an official LP. The members in the most well-known lineup were: Tommy Bolin: guitar, Jeff Cook: vocals & harmonica, Tom Stephenson: keyboards & vocals,  Stanley Sheldon: bass and Bobby Berge: drums. "Energy didn’t release any official albums or singles, but did complete a number of studio recordings, some of which appeared later on Tommy Bolin ArchivesCD releases. The first lineup of the band featuring Steig concentrated on long intense jams, often featuring Steig’s flute more than Tommy’s guitar. The band’s appeal was notably widened after adding a vocalist, beginning with Gary, then Jeff and later Max. The greatest amount of existing live material features Jeff Cook, and shows the band ranging from slow blues to rocking blues to hard rock to marathon fusion jams, often in one performance. 

Their studio output showed a band that would have made the big time if they had the power of a record deal. Some of the material written by Tommy with John Tesar and Jeff Cook went on to be used by Tommy in later bands. “Got No Time for Trouble” and “Praylude/Red Skies” were used in James Gang, “Lady Luck” with Deep Purple and “Dreamer” was used on Teaser." Lot's more information here at the official Bolin website.

Hydra LP 1974
Hydra are a band that I am still saving for another southern rock comp. They supply a nice southern rock interpretation here with great enthusiasm and cool vocals! "Hydra debuted in 1974 via the release of the group's self-titled album. With the Dallas, Texas to New Orleans "Glitter Queen" setting the LP in motion, many would have expected that the song was recorded by a glam group. By contrast, Hydra rolled out of the deep South, where the un-glam NASCAR, grits and guns defined the slower-paced way of life. Nevertheless, "Glitter Queen" is a strong intro track that is competently chased by "Keep You Around" and "It's So Hard". A cover of "Going Down" and the lengthy "Feel the Pain" fill-out the rock 'n' boogie side A. The upbeat "Good Time Man" continues the down home party groove, and the shortest track from the album, "If You Care to Survive" is delivered with aggression. The seven-minute-plus "Miriam" closes the Hydra LP with a mellow arrangement. As part of the Capricorn Records family, Hydra should have been a larger player from the proud '70s Southern rock scene."

Alabama State Troupers Road Show LP cover
To finish off, we have Don Nix himself giving us the ultimate rendition of Goin' Down. A rip-roaring live stage performance. Toward the end of the song, Don admits he's been 'down' since he was two years old, and ad-libs the phrase "A chicken ain't nothin' but a bird, and a bird ain't nothin' but a fowl", which seems to come from an old Cab Calloway song called "Chicken Ain't Nothing But a Bird". Then he goes on to state how Furry Lewis (blues hero of Don Nix who was part of The Alabama State Troupers) hasn't been kept down for 78 years. Does this shed more light on the origins of Going Down? He also Allmusic :- "Don Nix had deep Southern soul and blues roots, getting his start playing with Steve Cropper and Donald Duck Dunn in the Mar-Keys. These roots aren't as evident on his 1972 project Alabama State Troupers as his association with Leon Russell, whose pioneering work can be heard all over Road Show, the double-LP that captures the wild revue Nix took across America in 1972. Cut firmly from the same cloth that Russell provided for Joe Cocker's Mad Dogs & Englishmen revue, along with the similar Delaney & Bonnie band, the Alabama State Troupers is a careening rock & roll outfit that touches upon soul, country, gospel, and, in its occasional frontman Furry Lewis, blues. 

Lewis stepped into an absence left by Lonnie Mack, a superficially more suitable match for Nix, co-vocalist Jeanie Greene, and the Mt. Zion Band & Choir, but Lewis gives this an unexpected sense of community and heritage, emphasizing how the Alabama State Troupers stretch back far. That said, Road Show is very much an album of its time. Specifically, it is part of the Leon Russell axis, sounding like a kissing cousin to Delaney & Bonnie due to Nix's traded vocals with Greene, but its attitude is slightly closer to Mad Dogs & Englishmen, often feeling so overstuffed that it is about to burst. Nix isn't a vocalist of Cocker's stature, nor is Greene close to Bonnie Bramlett, which makes the wildcard of Lewis all the more compelling; he gives them gravity but also a bit of mischief. Nevertheless, the star in Alabama State Troupers isn't who is on the mike but rather the group itself, a collective that plays the kind of rambling, raucous American music that was briefly in vogue in the early '70s. Few have picked up this thread since, but that may be why it still sounds vital: it's teeming with passion, conviction and ideas that are still potent years after the music has receded into history."

Thanks for listenin', and keep Goin' Down!

Rich

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Tuesday, February 28, 2012

The Day After The Sabbath 63: No Sleep Til'burg (Roadburn Special)


Download from: [mf] or  [mg]
Unzip password:  tdats
This and the next volume, 64, makes a two-part special. 64 is here. I will leave it to the organiser of Roadburn festival in Tilburg, Holland, to explain some more :-

"We're huge supporters of Rich Stonerdoom's The Day After The Sabbath blog. It's the main source in our quest for obscure heavy 60s and 70s rock. It’s Rich’s aim to reveal the secret world of bands that were inspired by the early psychedelic, doom and hard rock greats but were too short-lived, un-commercial or just plain unlucky to gain the recognition that they probably deserved at the time. Now, Rich has dedicated some of his compilations to Roadburn; these two special volumes include all the classic 70s bands that have played the festival so far, along with tracks from a host of Dutch rock obscurities, which we wholeheartedly endorse!" - Roadburn festival 2012.

Delft's After Tea was founded in 1967 by Hans van Eyck and Polle Eduard, both ex-members of the Tee Set. Before taking a decidedly heavier approach on their third album (originally self-titled but named 'Joint House Blues' on a later German print) which I used here, the group produced a few Dutch hits like "Not Just A Flower In Your Hair". They split in 1971, after which Polle Eduard and (later member) Uli Grün were joined by guitarist Frank van der Kloot and drummer Shel Schellekens, calling themselves Drama. The Hague's Q65 were a rough and ready garage rock band, notorious for their drug and alcohol intake. They had a brief dalliance with success on the back of some early singles, one of which was promoted by the band's voyage to England in a rubber boat. This proved to be a successful stunt, even though half of them got sea-sick and spent more time on the support craft which was later revealed to have been towing them. They too became heavier in later incarnations and 'Injection' / 'Love Is Such a Good Thing' are from their third album, in 1970.

Track 3 is our first from a band that has played at Roadburn 2009. They should be reasonably well-known to you as one of the original and influential 'krautrock' bands. Amon Düül II emerged from the radical West German commune scene of the late sixties and feature heavily in this great BBC Krautrock ducumentary. There is not much info on Cinderella, except for what I have translated from the cover scans of a 1970s Dutch LP called "Fantasio Daze (Dutch Psychedelic Singles 1968-1971)". There were three girls and a guy; Betty Raatgever (guitar, vox) Renee Sampignon (bass) Bernardine de Jong (keys) and Nico van Es (drums). The track here is a dreamy piece of psychedelic folk, maybe influenced by Fairport Convention, and reportedly they were backed for this single by members of a favourite obscure Dutch band of mine, Blue Planet.

Eindhoven's Mr. Albert Show created three albums and they all show diversity beyond reproach. They managed to successfully turn their hand to what ever sound they wished and my chosen track here is uncharacteristically doomy and down-beat, luckily for us, but it still has their hints of unique strangeness. The next track, from Mushroom, has been a recent recommendation from my Dutch cohort in obscurity, Marc Joseph (of  Vitamin X), and a very intriguing one, I absolutely love the track and have been looking for more information. Our best lead so far is that one stated member, Jacob 'Cocky' Akkerman, is the late brother of Focus guitarist Jan Akkerman. It is also mentioned that Jacob played in an early band of Jan's, 'Johnny & His Cellar Rockers', and drummed on his 1968 solo LP. Pantherman is a track I was saving for a forthcoming glam novelty comp, but I cannot resist using it here as a piece of big fun that fairly rocks with a great hammond and guitar groove. There's not much information to share other than the artist's name was Frank Klunhaar. I must thank Robin of Purepop blog and his tireless search for original 45s, for bringing this one to more attention. [EDIT: a new website entry has appeared: "The recording of the first Pantherman single took place at the well known GTB studio in the Hague. I was assisted by Frans Meijer on drums, a former colleague from the Jimmy Bellmartin Band and Polle Eduard on bass, a well known rock musician and colleague of producer Shell Schellekens in several bands. The rest of the instruments I did myself, as well as all the vocals.

When the record was released on Polydor in Holland, the first reactions were rather mixed: one part of the "serious" Dutch media incrowd found the record weird and somewhat offensive -the lyrics and vocals were too controversial for them-, another smaller part was excited and thrilled.

Three days after the release I was invited to do a -what was to become- unique TV performance on the progressive show 'Nederpopzien' and because my management insisted on a specially developed solo choreography by a professional ballet dancer instead of performing with a rock band, I appeared alone on a small stage in the studio and did my thing just accompanied by some palm trees that were later that year completely demolished by Iggy Pop in a legendary TV appearance.

As a result of all this, the single was also released in Belgium on Polydor and in Germany on Metronome Records and entered the bubbling under charts. France followed later. 

Unfortunately the management company suddenly stopped their activities just after the release and I was on my own again.

Glamrock consisted -in the perception of most pro's in the Dutch and continental European music business and the general public- of the single successes by the mainstream glam acts in the top 40 and based on that Polydor persuaded me to become more commercial instead of developing the concept into a more album oriented direction. With my current knowledge of the music industry I consider this as a lack of A&R vision that unfortunately -in retrospective- severely damaged the potential of the original idea. 

Because I had no magagement and also had the ambition to produce my own records, I started to make somewhat more commercial demos at the Relight Studio in Hilvarenbeek, an 8-track studio with a very specific sound that was at that time not yet into rock music.

In co-operation with owner/engineer Dick van Velden I recorded the follow up single Panther Walk, for which I tried -with a twist- to integrate the funky grooves of the JB's into the basic rock & roll and jungle drums feel of Bo Diddley and during these recording sessions I did play all the instruments. Relight would a little later become a world famous recording studio where Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Boomtown Rats, Robert Fripp, Black Sabbath and many others came to record their albums and I became staff producer there in 1976.

In this period of the 70's you saw a glam artist like David Bowie recording in the Philly studios of Gamble and Huff for his album Young Americans and blue eyed soul artists Hall & Oates and Edgar Winter wear makeup on their record sleeves and looking very "Glam". Where by the way did P-funkateer George Clinton get his ideas for the mothership connection looks and wardrobe? The combination of glam and funk was not very common in those days and dance oriented music in general was often bashed by the more 'serious' pop and rock artists and the rock press. 

The b-side "20th Century Man" reflects the kind of surrealistic fantasy that I described above within a cinematic scenery in a cartoon-like setting.

Despite of the hilariously written 'dance course' by Drs.P -a well known Dutch cabaret artist and lyricist- that was published in several magazines and newpapers, the single was more or less ignored by radio and TV.

Disappointed by the lack of result so far, Polydor suggested to form a band and start touring upon the release of the third single "One Man Band", which title now seems rather contradictionary. At that moment I also decided to put down the Pantherman mask because the concept had not proven very successful.

I rehearsed two or three times with a couple of local musicians that I knew and they also appear on the sleeve of the record, such as the earlier mentioned Frans Meijer on drums, Floris Tuk on guitar (the nice backwards solo on the A-side is his) and bass player Jan Hendriks, later guitar player of one the most famous Duch bands ever called Doe Maar. Except for the guitar solo they didn't actually play on the record.

This single was even more ignored than the others and instead of further persuing a career as an artist, I decided to become a full time record producer with the later to become world famous Relight Studios in Hilvarenbeek."


Incredible Hog are the next Roadburn-appearance band, they played last year in 2011. They should be fairly well-known by now to most people who know my blog. I have seen them play a few times since they re-formed last year (not for the last time I hope) to celebrate Rise Above's re-issue of their only album "Volume 1". They can still rock the house down and I got some film when I saw them in London. There is an interview with band leader/guitarist Gordon Kenney here at Psychedelic Baby webzine. The John Bassman Group started life as a school band in Landgraaf, a municipality in south-eastern Limburg and also where one of Holland's biggest rock fests resides, Pinkpop. Their single album 'filthy sky' was a curious affair, a mix of country-tinged blues tracks, and west coast style psych tracks, these being the ones which frequently hit the mark with awesome fuzzy wah guitar and charismatic vox from Diana Leemhuis. John Theunissen and the 'bassman' Theo Wetzeis later joined Pussycat, who had a novelty hit with "Mississippi" in 1975.

On to track 10 with the next Roadburn band Groundhogs, who appeared at the fest in 2008. They probably don't need too much introduction so I will use these interesting quotes from guitarist Tony McPhee regarding the name of the 1970 album that 'Eccentric Man' is taken from. McPhee recalled the circumstances behind the album with the attention-grabbing title, which ran against fashionable philosophy at the time. McPhee refuses to take the entire credit for this revolutionary theory, admitting: "Well, it was forced on me a bit". Roy Fisher [Groundhogs manager] suggested that McPhee should think of something controversial for the new LP. "John Lennon had just made his famous quote about The Beatles being more popular than Christ, and everyone was up in arms. So Roy said 'Let's marry it up with the bomb. How about 'Thank Christ For The Bomb?'.  So I went home and I had to write these lyrics, and my initial thoughts were that in the First World War, if you were injured you were sent home. And that was my first idea - a soldier is blown up and his toes are blown off so he goes home again. No, that's not enough. So I thought, well, let's make it the atomic bomb, really piss people off."

Rabbit Food, from The Hague, made a single in 1970 with a nice flowing groove, a spritely bass line and sparse effective horns. Alas I can find no mention of them at all save the 45's cover image on a few web sites.

Next up; Apartment 1, who recorded a couple of albums. The first was under their original moniker 'Serpentine', named after a lake in London's Hyde Park. That had a commercial pop sound and most of the members were active session musicians at the time who contributed to acts including OPMC, California License, Big Boy & The Bouncers, The Free Soul, The Family Dog and singer Christine Holmes. For album no2, 'Open House', they turned up the riffs and excellent guitar skills of Peter van der Sande. He later moved on to bass in Focus, and then Solution.

The late pianist Rob Hoeke had an interesting career, not much of it touching on the heavy side that I usually use but it did now and again. Primarily a boogie woogie and blues player, he began in 1957 with his brother Paul in the Rob Hoeke Boogie Woogie Quartet. After an opportunity to sit in on piano with The Rolling Stones in Sweden, R&B became his focus and he formed The Rob Hoeke R&B Group, and other such permutations within his circle of collaborators. The album used here, 'Celsius 232.8', included a few fine psych moments, and some of his singles rocked hard. He had a spot of bad luck in 1974 and lost a couple of fingers on an engine fan while fixing his car, but in 1975 he was back with an album humourously entitled 'Fingerprints'.

So this volume comes to an end with a band that played Roadburn 2007; Blue Cheer. I have chosen a song that was first brought to my attention by hearing Ufomammut's astounding cover on their 1999 'Satan' EP, which I used back on vol38. This brings us nicely full-circle as Ufomammut are a contemporary Roadburn live favourite. Not much needs to be said about these formative San Franciscans I’m sure, as they are frequently referenced amongst the inventors of heavy metal. There are a few interesting points to be brought up about this track though. It's from their lesser-mentioned period after 1968's Outsideinside. The power trio became a four-piece with the addition of 2nd guitarist Randy Holden (See vol2 & vol57). Renowned for his guitar volume and distortion experiments, the resulting album "New! Improved! Blue Cheer" actually came out sounding much cleaner and more restrained compared to previous efforts, this spelt a new chapter for the band and the end of their proto-metal notoriety. My opinion is that the band considered themselves to be developing as musicians, and as their proficiency increased they felt less urge to hide under thick fuzz and distortion. 'Peace of Mind' is an other-worldly track that creates an ambience of it's own just from the sheer intention of the song writing, without having to rely too heavily on effects or other bells and whistles.

Track List:

01. After Tea - You've Got to Move Me (1970)
       from album 'joint house blues'
02. Q65 - Injection / Love Is Such a Good Thing (1970)
       from album 'afghanistan'    
03. Amon Düül II - Stumbling Over Melted Moonlight (1971)
       from album 'tanz der lemminge'
04. Cinderella - From Town to Town (1971)
       single
05. Mr. Albert Show - Electronic Baby (1971)
       from album 'warm motor'
06. Mushroom - Crying For You (1970)
       single
07. Pantherman - Pantherman (1974)
       single
08. Incredible Hog - Tadpole (1973)
       from album 'volume 1'
09. John Bassman Group - Two Rings (1970)
       from album 'filthy sky'
10. Groundhogs - Eccentric Man (1970)
       from album 'thank christ for the bomb'
11. Rabbit Food - My Mind's Phantasy (1970)
       single
12. Apartment 1 - Like A Queen (1970)
       from album 'open house'
13. The Rob Hoeke R&B Group - The Rain Still Falling From Above (1968)
       from album 'celcius 232.8'
14. Blue Cheer - Peace of Mind (1969)
       from album 'new! improved!'

Thanks for listening! Rich
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references:

Alex Gitlin's Nederpop Encyclopedia | Dutch Progessive Rock
Nederbeat | Dutch Sixties Beatgroups | Gooisch Pop Archief

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Friday, December 18, 2009

The Day After The Sabbath IV compilation



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pass:  tdats

Part 4 of my compilation series.

97MB, 192kb/s

01. Zior - Entrance Of The Devil/Strange Kind Of Magic - 1972
02. Gila - Aggression - 1971
03. Demian - Face the Crowd - 1970
04. Flied Egg - Rollin' Down The Broadway - 1972
05. Høst - Fattig Men Fri - 1974
06. Zakarrias - Who Gave You Love - 1971
07. Incredible Hog - To The Sea - 1973
08. Montrose - I Got The Fire - 1974
09. Speed, Glue & Shinki - Stoned Out Of My Mind - 1971
10. Primevil - Leavin' - 1974
11. Highway Robbery - Fifteen - 1972
12. Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs - Momma - 1970
13. Museo Rosenbach - Aldil del bene e del male - 1973
14. Gravytrain - Think Of Life - 1970
15. Wicked Lady - I'm A Freak - 1972
16. Necromandus - Mogidisimo - 1972

Thanks for listening! Rich

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